Tag Archives: Comic

Big Barda – DC Comics

Big Barda is a fictional comic book superheroine appearing in books published by DC Comics. She first appeared in Mister Miracle #4 (October 1971), and was created by Jack Kirby.

In a reversal of the stereotype associated with female characters at the time of her creation, Barda is physically more powerful than her husband and very protective of him.

Jack Kirby based Barda’s physical appearance on Lainie Kazan, who had recently appeared topless in Playboy. Mark Evanier, Kirby’s assistant during the Fourth World comics, has stated, “Jack based some of his characters (not all) on ponies in his life or in the news… the characterization between Scott ‘Mister Miracle’ Free and Barda was based largely—though with tongue in cheek—on the interplay betwixt Jack and his wife Roz.”

From Wikipedia

Momiji Sohma – Rabbit Form – Fruits Basket

Momiji Sohma, aged 15, is the rabbit of the Chinese zodiac. His father, one of the richer members of the Sohma family, is Japanese, while his mother is German (they speak German and Japanese in the manga, but only Japanese in the anime). Momiji is depicted as a cute, cheerful, androgynous boy who hides a sad family life behind his sunny demeanor. In an author’s note, Takaya described him as “the most comfortable” of the Sohmas with his spirit possession, and “the most successful of the boys.” Momiji is older than he initially appears, and Tohru is surprised to learn he is only a year younger than she is. To Kyo’s horror, Momiji wears the girl’s version of their high school uniform with shorts instead of a skirt, until he has a growth spurt at the start of his second year and switches to the boy’s uniform. He lives alone inside the Sohma family compound, and was raised by servants. His mother learned about the zodiac curse when she first held him, just after he was born, and was repulsed; she later had Hatori erase her memory that Momiji is her son. Because of this, his younger sister, Momo, is unaware he is her older brother, even though she is interested in him. Despite his upbringing, Momiji is insightful about others and emotionally strong. Momiji takes to Tohru very quickly, even hugging her when they are formally introduced despite his curse. He sometimes helps Tohru at her evening job as an office cleaner in one of his father’s buildings, and once substitutes for her when she is sick with a cold. He is very fond of Tohru, and even defies Akito to protect her. He later warns Kyo that if he does not act on his feelings for Tohru, someone else, such as himself, might steal her away; in the final chapter, Momiji tells Hatsuharu and Rin that he hopes to find a girlfriend as wonderful as Tohru. He plays the violin. Takaya derived his name from the ninth month of the traditional Japanese calendar, momijitsuki or “autumn leaves month”; he was supposed to have been named after the third month, the month of the rabbit, but according to the author, she mixed up his and Kureno’s positions in the zodiac. Voiced by: Ayaka Saitō (Japanese), Kimberly Grant (English)

–From Wikipedia

This is Momiji’s rabbit form and is eminently snuggleable!

Momiji Sohma – Fruits Basket

Momiji Sohma, aged 15, is the rabbit of the Chinese zodiac. His father, one of the richer members of the Sohma family, is Japanese, while his mother is German (they speak German and Japanese in the manga, but only Japanese in the anime). Momiji is depicted as a cute, cheerful, androgynous boy who hides a sad family life behind his sunny demeanor. In an author’s note, Takaya described him as “the most comfortable” of the Sohmas with his spirit possession, and “the most successful of the boys.” Momiji is older than he initially appears, and Tohru is surprised to learn he is only a year younger than she is. To Kyo’s horror, Momiji wears the girl’s version of their high school uniform with shorts instead of a skirt, until he has a growth spurt at the start of his second year and switches to the boy’s uniform. He lives alone inside the Sohma family compound, and was raised by servants. His mother learned about the zodiac curse when she first held him, just after he was born, and was repulsed; she later had Hatori erase her memory that Momiji is her son. Because of this, his younger sister, Momo, is unaware he is her older brother, even though she is interested in him. Despite his upbringing, Momiji is insightful about others and emotionally strong. Momiji takes to Tohru very quickly, even hugging her when they are formally introduced despite his curse. He sometimes helps Tohru at her evening job as an office cleaner in one of his father’s buildings, and once substitutes for her when she is sick with a cold. He is very fond of Tohru, and even defies Akito to protect her. He later warns Kyo that if he does not act on his feelings for Tohru, someone else, such as himself, might steal her away; in the final chapter, Momiji tells Hatsuharu and Rin that he hopes to find a girlfriend as wonderful as Tohru. He plays the violin. Takaya derived his name from the ninth month of the traditional Japanese calendar, momijitsuki or “autumn leaves month”; he was supposed to have been named after the third month, the month of the rabbit, but according to the author, she mixed up his and Kureno’s positions in the zodiac. Voiced by: Ayaka Saitō (Japanese), Kimberly Grant (English)

–From Wikipedia

Catwoman – DC Comics

Catwoman is a fictional character associated with DC Comics’ Batman franchise. Historically a supervillain, the character was created by Bill Finger and Bob Kane, partially inspired by Kane’s second cousin by marriage, Ruth Steel. Kane a frequent movie goer also mentioned that Jean Harlow was a model for the design.

The original and most widely known Catwoman, Selina Kyle, first appears in Batman #1 (Spring 1940) in which she is known as The Cat. She is a sometimes-adversary of Batman, known for having a complex love-hate (often romantic) relationship with him. In her first appearance, she was a whip-carrying burglar with a taste for high-stake thefts. For many years Catwoman thrived, but from September 1954 to November 1966 she took an extended hiatus due to the newly developing Comics Code Authority in 1954. These issues involved the rules regarding the development and portrayal of female characters that were in violation with the Comic Code.

Since the 1990s, Catwoman has been featured in an eponymous series that cast her as an antihero rather than a supervillain. The character has been one of Batman’s most enduring love interests. Many modern writers have also interpreted her activities and costumed identity as a response to a history of abuse.

–From Wikipedia

This particular version of the character is based on the Jim Balent version depicted in the Catwoman series from the 1990s.

Galactus – Marvel Comics

Galactus is a fictional character appearing in comic books and other publications published by Marvel Comics. Created by writer-editor Stan Lee and artist and co-plotter Jack Kirby, the character debuted in Fantastic Four #48 (March 1966), the first of a three-issue story later known as “The Galactus Trilogy”.

Debuting in the Silver Age of Comic Books, Galactus has appeared in over four decades of Marvel continuity, also starring in a one-shot publication Super-Villain Classics: Galactus the Origin #1 (May 1983), and the limited series Galactus the Devourer (Sept. 1999 – March 2000). The character has been featured in other Marvel-endorsed products and merchandise such as arcade and video games, animated television series, action figures, trading cards, and a film, Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer.

In 2009, Galactus was ranked as number five on the pop culture site IGN.com’s list of 100 top comic-book antagonists.

From Wikipedia

In case you’re wondering, he stands 43 inches tall, 2 feet wide at the antenna, and 1 foot deep!

Thanos 2.0 – Marvel Comics

Thanos is a fictional character that appears in comic books and other media published by Marvel Comics. The character first appeared in Iron Man #55 (Feb. 1973) and was created by writer-artist Jim Starlin.

Debuting in the Bronze Age of comic books, the character has featured in over three decades of Marvel continuity and a self-titled series. The character’s name is a derivation of Thanatos, the personification of death and mortality in Greek mythology.[citation needed] One of his most prominent storylines to date – the Infinity Gauntlet series – portrayed him as a mad cosmic tyrant bent on slaying half of all sentiences existing then in Marvel’s multiverse in order to appease the Marvel Universe’s actual (and more powerful) embodied personification of Death in an attempt to win her love.

Thanos has consistently recurred as a powerful villain, and has been featured across nearly Marvel’s entire product line, including animated television series; arcade and video games; toys and trading cards.

From Wikipedia

This particular doll is a slight improvement on an already existing version.

Gamora – Marvel Comics

Gamora is a fictional comic book character in Marvel Comics’ shared universe, known as the Marvel Universe. She is the adopted daughter of Thanos and the occasional love interest of Adam Warlock and Nova.

From Wikipedia

Matt – Death Note

Matt, whose real name is Mail Jeevas, is a consort of Mello’s. A character in the manga and anime versions, Matt was also a former resident of Wammy’s orphanage; Ohba described him as the “third most talented member” of the house. Matt is Mello’s helper as Matt performs espionage work and acts as an accomplice in Takada’s kidnapping, which results in his death when he is shot by Takada’s bodyguards. He is voiced by Tomohiro Nishimura in the Japanese anime and by Drew Nelson in English dub.

According to How to Read, Matt enjoys video games and isn’t outgoing. He also seems to be a chain smoker. He uses his last breath to smoke his cigarette. He is also behind Near and Mello in succeeding L.

Ohba said that he created Matt because when Mello started to act alone Ohba believed that he would find difficulty in advancing the story unless Mello had a character to interact with. Ohba said that to a reader Matt may appear to play video games and have no other actions, but he said that Matt’s existence was “important” in the story. In response to a question inquiring about which characters the creators had the most difficulty creating, Ohba cited Matt and said “I didn’t even know what kind of person he was!”

Obata said that he did not receive advance notice regarding Matt, who had the character concept of “a young man who loves gaming and doesn’t really care much about the world.” Obata said that he remembered seeing the thumbnails and asking his editor “Who’s this character?!” The thumbnails gave Matt a bowl haircut and goggles; Obata instead drew “what I liked.” Obata added that he could “create Matt naturally” as he had a “he probably won’t do much” mentality regarding characters introduced in the Near and Mello arc. His birthday is February 1, 1990.

From the Wikipedia

Bowel Disruptor – Transmetropolitan

Spider’s weapon of choice for most of the series is a handheld “bowel disruptor,” which causes instant and painful loss of bowel control, with various settings that allow him to vary the level of pain and discomfort the device will inflict, ranging from simple diarrhea to complete rectal prolapse. At a much harsher level, the victim has a bowel movement so dramatic and agonizing that it induces unconsciousness. While at least three times in the series, it is revealed through dialogue that the gun can be set to ‘Fatal Intestinal Maelstrom’. Spider prefers this weapon because, despite being illegal, it is (usually) non-lethal and its effects are untraceable. His assistants, Channon and Yelena, have also been armed with bowel disruptors during The Cure arc.

From the Wikipedia

This is the bowel disruptor which is a weapon most often wielded by Spider Jerusalem in the comic Transmetropolitan by Warren Ellis. It is created to be life sized and is made entirely of yarn and stuffing. The dial on the sides even turns!

Spider Jerusalem – Transmetropolitan

Spider Jerusalem is a fictional character and the protagonist of the comic book Transmetropolitan, created by writer Warren Ellis and artist Darick Robertson, introduced under the now-defunct Helix imprint of DC Comics before being moved to the Vertigo imprint.

Spider is a renegade gonzo journalist forced to return to The City after having exhausted a substantial advance from a publisher without completing the books required by contract. After five years of effective retirement as a long-haired hermit in a compound in the mountains, he returns to The City to complete the books, takes up work for an urban newspaper to support his writing, and finds himself battling political corruption at the highest level.

From the Wikipedia